Academic Courses

CALM

Calm 20

The aim of senior high school Career and Life Management (CALM) is to enable students to make well-informed, considered decisions and choices in all aspects of their lives and to develop behaviours and attitudes that contribute to the well-being and respect of self and others, now and in the future. CALM is the core course for health literacy at the senior high school level in Alberta. (taken from Alberta Education, Program of Studies)

English

ELA 9                                                    

ELA 9 is a general ELA course designed for the vast majority of Grade 9 students. The course takes an integrated approach to the development of reading, writing, speaking, listening, representing and viewing.  Much time and effort is spent on fundamental reading and writing skills. A student’s success at the English Language Arts 9 level will have a significant impact on whether a student is eligible to enter ELA 10-1 or ELA 10-2. 

http://education.alberta.ca/media/446205/Gr9frBroch.pdf

http://education.alberta.ca/admin/testing/achievement.aspx

http://education.alberta.ca/media/445775/pub9.pdf

 

ELA 10-1, ELA 20-1, ELA 30-1 (5 credits each)          

These courses are designed for students in the academic program.  ELA 10-1 is the introductory course in this stream which is intended for the student who wishes to complete his/her academic requirements and attend university.  (This stream is also required for some college programs.)  Sound reading and writing skills are fundamental requirements.  ELA 20-1 reviews literary terminology and techniques, exposing students to varied forms of pragmatic communication.  ELA 30-1 is the final phase of the academic Diploma Program, and provides an in-depth study of literary forms and concepts, a higher level of literary criticism, abstract thinking and advanced communication skills.  ELA 30-1 students are required to write a Provincial Diploma Exam which determines 50% of their course grade.  There is a direct correlation in ELA between maturity and success, so it is strongly advised that students not enrol in ELA 30-1 until their grade 12 year.

http://education.alberta.ca/admin/testing/diplomaexams.aspx               

http://education.alberta.ca/media/445715/srpub.pdf

http://education.alberta.ca/media/446124/SrHighfrBro.pdf

 

ELA 10-2, ELA 20-2, ELA 30-2 (5 credits each)

These courses are for students wishing to complete their General High School diploma.  ELA 10-2 is the first course in the -2 stream, which is most appropriate for students who experience difficulties with reading and writing.  This stream satisfies requirements for some college programs.  ELA 20-2 emphasizes practical communication skills which will serve the student in the world of work.  ELA 30-2 is the final course in the General Diploma route, emphasizing skills required in the adult workplace.  ELA 30-2 students are required to write a Provincial Diploma Exam which determines 50% of their course grade.

http://education.alberta.ca/admin/testing/diplomaexams.aspx

http://education.alberta.ca/media/446124/SrHighfrBro.pdf

http://education.alberta.ca/media/445715/srpub.pdf

Math

Mathematics 10C (5 credits)

Mathematics 10C is the starting point for the -1 and -2 course sequences. Students in the course study the following topics: Measurement (SI and Imperial), Trigonometry, Polynomial factoring and operations, Systems of equations and Linear relations and functions. 

Mathematics 10-3 (5 credits)

Students in this course study the following topics: Measurement (SI and Imperial), Trigonometry, Geometry, Income, and Algebraic and proportional reasoning.

Mathematics 20-1 (5 credits)

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of calculus. Topics include algebra and number; measurement; relations and functions; trigonometry; and permutations, combinations and binomial theorem.

Mathematics 20-2 (5 credits)

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of calculus. Topics include geometry, measurement, number and logic, logical reasoning, relations and functions, statistics, and probability.

Mathematics 20-3 (5 credits)

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the work force. Topics include algebra, geometry, measurement, number, statistics and probability.

Mathematics 30-1 (5 credits)

This is a rigourous course sequence designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills required for entry into university, college, technical school or other post-secondary programs that require the study of calculus such as engineering, science, business and many technology fields.

Mathematics 30-2 (5 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills required for university, college, technical school, or other post-secondary programs that do not require the study of calculus such as humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. 

Mathematics 30-3 (5 credits)

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills identified for entry into many of the trades and direct entry into the work force. 

Knowledge and Employability Courses Mathematics 10-4, 20-4 (5 credits each)

The Knowledge and Employability Mathematics courses are designed to assist students in developing the essential concepts, skills and attitudes of mathematics that are required for responsible participation in the home, the school, the workplace and the community.

Modern Languages

French 9, 10, 20, 30

Spanish 10, 20, 30

The Modern Languages Department currently offers French 9, 10, 20, 30 and Spanish 10, 20, 30.  All modern languages courses involve listening and reading comprehension, sociocultural studies, vocabulary acquisition and the use of a variety of strategies in interacting with the language.  Students can expect the daily classes to be divided into listening and speaking activities, reading and writing activities and activities related to understanding the cultural aspects of French/Spanish speaking countries.  Students can expect to work individually, with partners and with groups.  Activities are teacher directed and also student directed.

Off-Campus Education

Sign up for work experience, even if you do not need the credits. Use it to boost your average for the Alexander Rutherford Scholarship and other scholarships (use your mark as your fifth course). Use work experience as the fifth course for university and college entrance requirements as well.

Participating in off-campus education is both a privilege and responsibility. Students are expected to comply with company rules and expectations, and to the conduct expected of Lethbridge School District No. 51 students. Significant breaches in either case may lead to the termination of the placement. The student, parent and employer will be informed by the off-campus education facilitator if disciplinary action is warranted. If it is a school-related issue, no details of the circumstances will be provided to the employers without parent permission.

Students:

  1. All work experience must be in southern Alberta for site visit and workers’ compensation guidelines
  2. Complete the one credit HCS 3000 course in CALM or through an alternative school delivery
  3. Complete and return the work experience agreement form and the student learning plan ASAP to the Career Practitioners office at your school
  4. Submit monthly proof of hours and final employer evaluation in the same way, or they may be emailed to Jacquie.lowe@lethsd.ab.ca. Also inform us if you are no longer at the worksite.
  5. Perform well as the jobsite. Know the employer’s cellphone-use policy and follow it. Be on time, know exactly when the shifts will be, attend work consistently, know the employer’s procedure for calling in sick or switching shifts, adhere to any confidentiality expectations and agreements and be enthusiastic, ethical, consistent and learn
  6. Call the off-campus education facilitator, Andrew Krul, 403-894-0375, if there are any concerns about the safety of the jobsite, or other concerns.

Remember:

  • There are three levels of work experience (15, 25, 35)
  • Ten credits can be earned at each level
  • Only 15 credits count towards your diploma requirements. However, all 30 credits will show up on your transcript and aid in scholarship applications and entrance to university
  • For every 25 hours you work/volunteer, you may receive one credit, up to a maximum of 10 credits (250 hours). To receive any credits for work experience, you must have a minimum of 75 hours (three credits)
  • You can have more than one work-experience contract at the same time. More than 10 credits may be earned at the same worksite in there is an increase of responsibilities, or a student works in a different department
  • Credits may be earned as part of part-time jobs, volunteering or career exploration at jobsites

Contact information:

Andrew Krul, off-campus education facilitator, 403-894-0375, Andrew.Krul@lethsd.ab.ca

Jaye Swanson, career practitioner, 403-892-7884, jaye.swanson@lethsd.ab.ca

Physical Education

Physical Education 9, 10, 20, 30

The aim of the physical education program at Chinook High School is to enable individuals to develop the knowledge, skills and attitude necessary to lead an active, healthy lifestyle. Within Phys Ed, students at Chinook are able to take part in a variety of outdoor activities including softball, tennis, ultimate, golf, football, and soccer. When the weather turns cold we keep things moving indoors with a variety of team and individual activities such as lacrosse, badminton, basketball, fitness, ice sports, dance, yoga, table tennis, floor hockey, as well as the ever popular tchoukball. Phys Ed 10 is a required course for all students prior to graduation but the fun doesn’t stop there! Join us in PE 20 and 30 for such activities as cycling, hiking trips to Waterton, canoeing, wall climbing, as well as archery and swimming! If you have any questions please come visit Ard, Bruce, Tammy or Sydney down in the Phys Ed Dept. for more info.

Science

Science 10 (5 credits)

This general science course meets the needs of students planning to attend university. It includes an introduction to biology, chemistry, physics and earth science. Science 10 leads to 20 level courses in biology, chemistry and physics as well as Science 20. For any further questions about this course please contact Jaclyn Dudas: jaclyn.dudas@lethsd.ab.ca

Science 14 (5 credits)

Science 14 is a general science course meeting the needs of non-academic students. It involves a study of the relationship of science to such important issues as the environment, household products, body systems, and technological change. This course leads to Science 24. For any further questions about this course please contact Nick Straat: nick.straat@lethsd.ab.ca

Science 24 (5 credits)

Science 24 is the second general science course for non-academic students. It includes units in biology, chemistry, physics and earth sciences. Completion of this course is sufficient to meet the requirements of an Alberta High School Diploma for the sciences. For any further questions about this course please contact Nick Straat: nick.straat@lethsd.ab.ca

Chemistry 20, 30 (5 credits each)

This course sequence is intended for university-bound students with an interest in science. Topics covered include the properties and measurement of matter, atoms, elements and the periodic table, and the classification and nomenclature of compounds. For any further information about these courses please contact Jaclyn Dudas: jaclyn.dudas@lethsd.ab.ca

Science 20, 30 (5 credits each)

This course sequence is designed for university-bound students who are not planning to enter a science-dependent faculty or program. For any further information about these courses please contact Todd Myers: todd.myers@lethsd.ab.ca

Physics 20,30 (5 credits each)

This course sequence is intended for university-bound students with an interest in science. Units include study of kinematics, dynamics, electricity and magnetism, EMR and nuclear physics. For any further questions about these courses please contact Katrina Hurdle: chris.schalk@lethsd.ab.ca

Biology 20, 30 (5 credits each)

This course sequence is intended for university-bound students with an interest in science. Units include study in human systems, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, ecosystems and genetics. For any further questions about these courses please contact Todd Myers: todd.myers@lethsd.ab.ca

Social Studies

Social Studies 9

Students will analyze the relationship between Canada’s political and legislative processes and their impact on issues pertaining to governance, rights, citizenship and identity. Students will also explore issues of economics and their impact on quality of life, citizenship and identity in Canada and the United States.

Social Studies 10-1, 10-2, 10-4 (5 credits each)

Students will explore multiple perspectives on the origins of globalization and the local, national andinternational impacts of globalization on lands, cultures, economies, human rights and quality of life.Students will examine the relationships among globalization, citizenship and identity to enhance skills forcitizenship in a globalizing world. The infusion of multiple perspectives will allow students to examine the effects of globalization on peoples in Canada and throughout the world, including the impact on Aboriginal and Francophone communities.

Social Studies 20-1, 20-2 , 20-4 (5 credits each)

Students will explore the complexities of nationalism in Canadian and international contexts. They will study the origins of nationalism and the influence of nationalism on regional, international and global relations. The infusion of multiple perspectives will allow students to develop understandings of nationalism and how nationalism contributes to the citizenship and identities of peoples in Canada.

Social Studies 30-1 and 30-2 (5 credits each)

Students will explore the origins and complexities of ideologies and examine multiple perspectives regarding the principles of classical and modern liberalism. An analysis of various political and economic systems will allow students to assess the viability of the principles of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues.